5 Lincoln Street, Canton, MA 02021
781-710-6686 | julie@donahuere.com



Posted by Julie Shanks on 4/23/2019

This Single-Family in Franklin, MA recently sold for $500,000. This Colonial,Garrison style home was sold by Julie Shanks - Donahue Real Estate Co..


409 Oakland Pkwy, Franklin, MA 02038

Single-Family

$499,900
Price
$500,000
Sale Price

8
Rooms
4
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Your search is over! Come see this spacious and bright 4 bedroom colonial in the Kennedy School district! Updated kitchen (2018) includes gas range, new granite countertops and new flooring. Large, sunny family room with bay window offers plenty of space for relaxing or play. Looking for a cozier space? You can find it in a bright living room with wood stove insert. Second floor features generously sized bedrooms - all with hardwood floors. Spacious master bedroom includes renovated master bath (2010) and partially finished basement offers extra space for playroom or an office. This home also features brand new roof (2018), newer water heater (2014) and furnace, updated lighting, large fenced in yard, screened in deck, gas heat, town water/sewer, vinyl siding and windows for easy maintenance and a 2-car garage. All appliances included! Don't let this one pass you by!! Priced for quick sale!

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Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Julie Shanks on 4/21/2019

If you intend to sell your house, you may want to let your family know about your decision. In fact, there are many reasons why you should consult with family members before you add your house to the real estate market. These reasons include:

1. You can address any concerns or questions.

Family members may have concerns or questions about your decision to sell your home. Fortunately, you can address their concerns and questions before you list your residence.

Remember, family members care about your well-being. If you involve them in the home selling process, you may be able to avoid potential conflicts down the line. Perhaps best of all, if you share your decision to sell your residence with family members, you can help them get on board with your decision.

2. You can plan ahead for the home selling journey.

The home selling journey may prove to be long and difficult, particularly for an individual who initially tries to work alone. Luckily, family members can offer lots of assistance as you get ready to sell your house.

If you inform family members about your decision to sell your home, they can help you prep for all aspects of the property selling journey. For example, family members can help you clean your residence and ensure that it looks great both inside and outside. As a result, telling your family members about your decision to sell your house may enable you to speed up the process of selling your house.

3. You can receive home selling guidance and support.

Family members are ready to help you in any way they can. Thus, if family members sold houses in the past, they may be able to share their house selling experiences with you. And as such, you can learn from their past experience so you are better equipped than ever before to streamline the home selling journey.

Lastly, as you prepare to enter the housing market, you may want to collaborate with a real estate agent. This housing market professional is happy to help you break the news about your decision to sell your home to family members. Also, he or she will provide comprehensive support as you navigate each stage of the house selling process.

Typically, a real estate agent will craft a personalized home selling strategy based on you, your home and your house selling goals. He or she next will set up property showings and open house events to promote your residence to prospective buyers. If a buyer submits an offer to purchase your house, a real estate agent will help you review this proposal so you can determine whether to approve, reject or counter it.

For home sellers who want to enjoy a fast, profitable house selling experience, it often is beneficial to hire a real estate agent. If you have a real estate agent at your side, you can quickly stir up interest in your home and boost the likelihood of maximizing your property sale earnings.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Julie Shanks on 4/14/2019

First things first, if you are just in love with modern bathroom or kitchen features, they are worth it for you. It's always worth it to create a space that you love. Now, if you want that new kitchen or bathroom to add value to your property, increase its marketability or its future resale value, its time for the research because not all upgrades are made equal and there may be a better way to spend that renovation money.

Upgrades that Add Value

The most straightforward way to increase the value of your home is to add usable square footage. That means more living space to use. You can add this space by finishing out a basement or attic, and by adding another bedroom or bathroom to the home. Extra space goes a long way to increase your properties market value. As many buyers consider homes by bedroom and bathroom count, adding just one more can change the category in which your home resides. A three-bedroom, three-bathroom house sounds larger and sells for more than that same home when it was just three-bedroom, two-bathroom house.

You can also increase your home's value with small upgrades. You can get the best bang for your buck with—you'll never guess—a new front door. Nearly 100% of the cost of the door adds to your home's value. Now, that won't work with just any front door, talk to your contractor or real estate agent about the best style for your property. You need a door that will enhance your entryway and not look like an afterthought to get that instant dash of curb appeal. 

You can also get substantial value from minor repair upgrades such as new windows or replacing discolored vinyl siding. These minor upgrades work like a new paint job and can increase the value of the home and the curb appeal at a much lower cost than a full kitchen or bath remodel.

Still, want that kitchen upgrade? Minor kitchen upgrades can have high returns of their own. You don't have to completely gut the entire thing; just new cabinet doors and fixtures make a huge difference. You can finalize it with classy new appliances and get yourself an 80% return on your new kitchen investment.

Upgrades That Aren’t Worth It

Pay attention to the cost of your remodel compared to the overall value of your home. Spending 50% or more of your equity on your kitchen remodel just isn't going to work well. A $100,000 remodel on a $250,000 property won't add nearly that in additional value to your home. So, if you want to sell your property for $350,000 instead, this isn't the plan for you. Nothing says you can't get plenty of enjoyment out of the kitchen upgrade, just don't plan on selling it for as much as you paid and focus on getting the kitchen you really want.

Similarly, while a pool sounds like a fabulous investment, they are usually much more expensive than they are worth and only really increase home value in specific locations, mostly those without colder winter weather. If your area has even a bit of winter, the pool will take a lot of extra care and can actually decrease the interest in your property.

Talk to your real estate professional about the best upgrades to increase your property’s value in the current market.





Posted by Julie Shanks on 4/7/2019

The home buying process can be long and daunting. From trying to find the right home to facing rejected offers, it can seem endless. Eventually, you will find the right home and get that offer accepted. Now you must face the next phase what’s called “closing” on a home. What exactly happens at the closing table can vary based on your own situation, but the important thing to know is that the closing table is where the deal is sealed and signed. The home of your dreams will finally be yours!


Find The Location


The location of the closing will be determined beforehand. It’s usually at a lawyer’s office but it could be at a realtor’s office. The attorney who has been chosen will be noted on the closing documents you receive before you get there.   


Get Ready To Write Large Checks


When you’re closing on a home, this is the time that the downpayment is expected along with all of the lawyer’s fees, taxes, commissions, assessments, and other agreements. This money should be presented at the time of closing and there’s no wiggle room on the timing, so be sure you have the cash handy in your account. Often, a bank check will be required to pay these fees along with the downpayment. Your lender will give a a detailed report of the fees that are required before you even head to the closing table, so you’ll have time to prepare.


Do Some Hand Stretches


There will be plenty of pens available at the closing. You’ll be there for awhile signing many important documents, so bring some water. If you don’t have a safe or file folders, you’ll want to get them as well. Depending on how your closing is conducted, a lawyer or other authorized person will be present to explain the legal jargon to you for every piece of paper that you’re signing. Every document that you sign should be saved for your reference and safe keeping. The proof of insurance and the deed to your property are definitely documents that you’ll want to have handy for a long time to come. Your home is one of the largest purchases that you’ll ever make in your lifetime, so be sure to keep that paperwork in order. 


After Closing Ends


After all of the papers are signed and the walkthrough of the home is complete, you’re a homeowner! In most cases, you’ll be able to call the home your own immediately. In some special cases, there are post-closing agreements that include repairs that couldn’t be done ahead of time, or other transactions that the seller may have agreed with you on at an earlier date. 


In most cases, everything will be taken care of right at the closing table. One of the most exciting moments is when the keys are handed over to you! After a long time of searching, many phone calls, and a lot of work, now you can start putting that elbow grease into your home!




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Julie Shanks on 3/31/2019

Called “common-interest housing” condos, co-ops, flats, townhomes, and apartments have different meanings to different buyers and even have different colloquial meanings than the official real estate industry meanings. Below you'll find a breakdown of the differences between these housing types along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. 

What is “Common Interest Housing”?

Before going too deep, it is essential to understand just what "common-interest housing" actually is. This type of real estate involves a combination of individually owned areas and shared areas in a single property. Shared areas often include pools, parking, and clubhouses, but it can also mean shared landscaping, exteriors, fences and roofs depending on the type of property. A property manager, homeowners association (HOA) or a combination of the two maintains common areas.

Condos and Co-Ops

Condominiums, more commonly called condos, are single home units in a shared property. A homeowner separately owns each unit. The shared property types range from high rise buildings, also called apartments or flats, to conjoined homes townhouse-style. A single family home in a planned community or a mobile home in a community or park can also be condos. Instead of a specific type of home style, "condominium" is a legal term in the United States that refers to the ownership status, so homes of any form, connected or not, can qualify if they are part of a shared property community. 

A co-op, short for cooperative housing development, is another thing entirely. While similarly structured with private and shared areas, co-op owners purchase and own shares in the real estate development instead of their specific portion of the property. All the shareholders have a voice in the real estate corporation, and their investment includes the right to live in a unit. Usually, the monthly expenses of the real estate corporation split between shareholders, so this can be an extra expense you need to plan for. Similarly to condominium, "co-op" is a legal term that refers to the ownership style of the building or neighborhood instead of the building's structure. Depending on your area, you can find co-ops in apartment-style buildings, single family home neighborhoods and townhome style shared wall housing. 

Flats, Townhomes, and Apartments

You’ve noticed the words flat, apartment and townhome in the descriptions of condos and co-ops above. This is because apartments, flats, and townhomes don't have such specific legal meanings. The term "apartment" most often refers to rental units, usually in a single building or set of structures. These are generally not owned, but instead leased or rented from the owner of the entire building or complex. However, since apartments are just a building style with several units that have shared walkways and entryways, apartments can be rentals, condos or co-ops depending on the situation. 

Townhomes refer to a specific building style where the house connects to another house on at least one side. Just like apartments, townhomes could be rentals, co-ops, condos or single-family homes. The true townhome design requires both homes to have separate side-walls even though they touch. However, a lot of condo, co-op and apartment designs look like townhomes without actually meeting the construction requirements. Do this by styling the front or backs of each unit differently, even if constructed as part of a single building. 

Are you thinking of buying a condominium or co-op? Talk to your real estate agent about what's available in your area!




Categories: Uncategorized